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Third World problems...we've got them.

It is going to get worse and it may never get better, kiddies. Just watch for the reaction to come... GOP Rep. Steve Scalise shot at co...

"Let no freedom be allowed to novelty, because it is not fitting that any addition should be made to antiquity. Let not the clear faith and belief of our forefathers be fouled by any muddy admixture." -- Pope Sixtus III

Friday, December 14, 2012

'Cause black folks, leftists, and ESPN clowns CAN'T be racists, that's why.





From The Urban Daily.com:


Is RG3 Distancing Himself From Black People?


ESPN’s Rob Parker has ignited a serious discussion of the changing views of race when he called Washington redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III a “cornball brother.”

Parker, who is the host of ESPN’s “First Take,” called RGIII out because he feels the football star is “distancing himself from his black people.” Rob Parker’s rant came after Robert Griffin III said being African-American doesn’t define him as a person. What added fuel to Parker’s fire is Griffin having a white fiancée and being a Republican.

Golly, that's the race traitor trifecta! I'll bet ESPN will never again refer to Mr. Griffin as an "athletic quarterback". He's so obviously white he must hereafter be called "cerebral" and a "gym rat" with a "high motor".

Rob Parker got all bent out of shape because of Griffin’s comments in a USA Today article. In the article, RGIII is quoted:

“I am an African-American in America. That will never change. But I don’t have to be defined by that…We always try to find similarities in life, no matter what it is so they’re going to try to put you in a box with other African-American quarterbacks – Vick, Newton, Randall Cunningham, Warren Moon…That’s the goal. Just to go out and not try to prove anybody wrong but just let your talents speak for themselves.”
I may be getting old, kiddies, but that sounds like MLK Jr. to me.

The “First Take” host responded to the USA Today article with a pointed question:

“It makes me wonder deeper about him. I’ve talked to some people in Washington D.C. My question, which is just a straight, honest question, is he a brother or is he a cornball brother”

Retroactive abortion: To the 40th trimester and beyond!

It's not just that schoolkids are easy targets, kiddies. The Death Worshippers have taught us they are inconvenient, expensive, and disposable.

From Fox News:

  • URGENT: At Least 26 Dead, Including 18 Kids, in Conn. School Shooting

    Authorities say at least 26 people, including 18 children, were killed Friday when a gunman clad in black military gear opened fire inside a Connecticut elementary school.

    A law enforcement official said the shooter, who is dead, was from New Jersey and had ties to Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. Authorities recovered a Glock and Sig Sauer 9mm handgun, but it was unclear who killed the shooter, who wore black combat garb and a military vest.

    Local news outlets report that the shooting occurred inside a kindergarten classroom, and that all the pupils in that classroom are unaccounted for. 
    An official with knowledge of the situation said the 20-year-old gunman, whose name has not been released, also had a .223-caliber rifle. The motive is not yet known.

    Police are also questioning another man in connection with the shooting. Witnesses told the Connecticut Post that a handcuffed man, dressed in camouflage, was led out of a nearby woods by officers. 

    Connecticut State Police Lt. Paul Vance said during an afternoon news conference that police arrived at the scene "within minutes" of a 911 call placed shortly after 9:30 a.m.

    “Every door, every crack, every crevice of that school” was checked, Vance said. “The entire school was searched.”

    Vance did not give details about the number of victims other than to say they included students and staff, pending notification of the families. He said more information would be released, possibly later Friday.

    The massacre began inside the school's main office as the principal was making morning announcements. Sources told Fox News students throughout the school could hear gunshots over the intercom system before the gunman entered the kindergarten classroom and continued his bloody rampage. 

    A dispatcher at the Newtown Volunteer Ambulance Corps said a teacher was shot in the foot and taken to Danbury Hospital. Local news outlets also reported that the principal was among those shot. 

    Parent Lisa Procaccini told Fox News that her daughter was sitting in a classroom when she and others heard gun shots. 

    "She was in a small class -- a reading group and they started hearing bangs," Procaccini said. "Her teacher, and I’m grateful  for this, rushed kids into the bathroom and locked the door. They told kids it was hammering and tried to keep them calm.”

    "Children were crying," Procaccini said. "She did tell me about a little boy that was in a police officer’s arms, bleeding. I don’t know if she gets it."

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said two firearms were recovered from the scene. 

    President Obama was notified of the shooting around 10:30 am ET, White House officials said. 

    The Newtown School District has locked down schools as a preventive measure to ensure the safety of students and staff.

    A statement on the district's website stated that afternoon kindergarten classes have been canceled.

    The elementary school has close to 700 students. 

    Newtown is in Fairfield County, about 45 miles southwest of Hartford and 60 miles northeast of New York City.  
  •  VIDEOS: Multiple Deaths in School Shooting | Mother of Student at School Speaks | Follow @FoxNews
  • PHOTOS: 26 Dead in School Shooting

From AP via Yahoo News: 

Source: Shooting suspect had ties to school


A law enforcement official says the attacker in the Connecticut school shootings is a 20-year-old man with ties to the school.

The official said that a gun used in the attacks is a .223-caliber rifle. The official also said that New Jersey state police are searching a location in that state in connection with the shootings, said by an official in Connecticut to have left 27 dead, including 18 children.

The official in Washington spoke on the condition of anonymity because the source was not authorized to speak on the record about the developing criminal investigation.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Dave Brubeck, Requiescat in pace.

"Take Five" isn't the only great thing Mr. Brubeck produced, but it would have been enough for me.

 

From The Canadian Press via Yahoo! Canada News:

Jazz legend Dave Brubeck, who helped define genre's rhythms in 1950s and '60s, dies at 91

 

You don't have to be a jazz aficionado to recognize "Take Five," the smoky instrumental by the Dave Brubeck Quartet that instantly evokes swinging bachelor pads, hi-fi systems and cool nightclubs of the 1950s and '60s.

"Take Five" was a musical milestone — a deceptively complex jazz composition that managed to crack the Billboard singles chart and introduce a new, adventurous sound to millions of listeners.

In a career that spanned almost all of American jazz since World War II, Brubeck's celebrated quartet combined exotic, challenging tempos with classical influences to create lasting standards.

The pianist and composer behind the group, Brubeck died Wednesday of heart failure at a hospital in Norwalk, Connecticut. He was a day shy of his 92nd birthday.

Brubeck believed that jazz presented the best face of America to the world.

"Jazz is about freedom within discipline," he said in a 2005 interview with The Associated Press. "Usually a dictatorship like in Russia and Germany will prevent jazz from being played because it just seemed to represent freedom, democracy and the United States.

"Many people don't understand how disciplined you have to be to play jazz. ... And that is really the idea of democracy — freedom within the Constitution or discipline. You don't just get out there and do anything you want."

Amen to that, brother.

The common thread that ran through Brubeck's work was breaking down the barriers between musical genres — particularly jazz and classical music. He was inspired by his mother, a classical pianist, and later by his composition teacher, the French composer Darius Mihaud, who encouraged his interest in jazz and advised him to "keep your ears open" as he travelled the world.

"When you hear Bach or Mozart, you hear perfection," Brubeck said in 2005. "Remember that Bach, Mozart and Beethoven were great improvisers. I can hear that in their music."

Brubeck was always fascinated by the rhythms of everyday life. In a discussion with biographer Doug Ramsey, he recalled the rhythms he heard while working as a boy on cattle drives at the northern California ranch managed by his father.

The first time he heard polyrhythms — the use of two rhythms at the same time — was on horseback.

"The gait was usually a fast walk, maybe a trot," he said. "And I would sing against that constant gait of the horse. ... There was nothing to do but think, and I'd improvise melodies and rhythms."

American music...How cool is that?

Brubeck combined classical influences and his own innovations on the seminal 1959 album "Time Out" by his classic quartet that included alto saxophonist Paul Desmond, drummer Joe Morello and bassist Eugene Wright.

True genius surrounds itself with genius and is never jealous.

It was the first jazz album to deliberately explore time signatures outside of the standard 4/4 beat or 3/4 waltz time. It was also the first million-selling jazz LP and is still among the bestselling jazz albums of all time.

Columbia executives blocked its release for nearly a year — until label President Goddard Lieberson intervened.

"They said, 'We never put out music that people can't dance to, and they can't dance to these rhythms that you're playing,'" Brubeck recalled in 2010. He also wanted a painting by Joan Miro on the cover, something else the record company had never done.

Hee-hee.

"I insisted that we go with something new," he said. "And to their surprise, it became the biggest jazz recording they ever made."

The album opens with "Blue Rondo a la Turk," a piece inspired by Turkish street musicians Brubeck heard on a 1958 State Department tour. The piece was in 9/8 time — nine beats to the measure instead of the customary two, three or four beats — and blended folk rhythms with jazz and a Mozart piece.

Cool, baby. Way cool.

The album also featured "Take Five," the cool and catchy odd-metered tune that became the Brubeck quartet's theme. The tune was derived from a pattern that Morello liked to play backstage. Brubeck asked Desmond to write a two-part melody over the rhythm, and Brubeck patched the pieces together.

"It was a song that people could relate to, and it influenced the future of the music," said George Wein, a jazz pianist and founder of the Newport Jazz Festival.

Good music is a universal language. It is understood implicitly, like a smile.

When the Romulans try to take us out, we should play "Take Five" for them so they won't kill us...

That's assuming our humanity isn't crushed by the American Stalin and his useful idiots before that day arrives. 

Brubeck "proved that a song with five beats in it and one with seven beats in it could become popular," pianist Herbie Hancock said in an email.

The jazz master played a key role in popularizing the first jazz festivals in the 1950s, playing at the Newport festival at least 50 times and helping to found the Monterey Jazz Festival.

He was also the first modern jazz musician pictured on the cover of Time magazine — on Nov. 8, 1954.

Brubeck always felt that his successful jazz career led fans to overlook the second career he launched as a jazz-inspired classical orchestral and choral composer in 1967 after disbanding his original quartet.

His experience in World War II led him to look beyond jazz to compose oratorios, cantatas and other extended works touching on themes involving religion, civil rights and peace.

"I knew I wanted to write on religious themes when I was a GI in World War II," Brubeck said, recalling how he was trapped behind German lines in the Battle of the Bulge and nearly killed. "I saw and experienced so much violence that I thought I could express my outrage best with music."

The best way to combat horror? Beauty.

His interest in classical music was inspired by his mother, Elizabeth Ivey Brubeck, a classical pianist, who was initially disappointed by her youngest son's interest in jazz. She later came to appreciate his music.

Born in Concord, California, on Dec. 6. 1920, Brubeck took piano lessons with his mother as a child. Then his father moved the family to a cattle ranch in the foothills of the Sierras.

When he enrolled at the College of the Pacific in 1938, Brubeck had intended to major in veterinary medicine and return to ranching. But while working his way through college by playing piano in nightclubs, he became smitten with jazz and changed his major to music. In 1942, he married Iola Whitlock, a fellow student who became his lifelong partner, librettist, and sometime manager.

Brubeck joined the Army as an infantry man, but ended up leading the semi-official Wolf Pack band attached to Gen. George S. Patton's army. They played popular standards as well as some of his first original jazz tunes, including "We Crossed the Rhine," based on the rhythm of trucks hitting the metal pontoon bridges as they entered Germany.

His band, which was one of the first integrated units in the then-segregated Army, reopened the Opera House in Nuremberg, the site of mass rallies organized by the Nazis, who had banned jazz.

Take that, Hitler!

Years later, the addition of Wright to Brubeck's quartet made the group one of the nation's best-known integrated music acts. A longtime champion of civil rights, Brubeck cancelled lucrative gigs at Southern universities and on television's Bell Telephone Hour when the organizers insisted that he replace Wright. He refused to play in South Africa under apartheid.

After his discharge, he enrolled at Mills College in Oakland, California. That's where he formed an octet, including Desmond on alto sax, Dave van Kreidt on tenor sax, Cal Tjader on drums and Bill Smith on clarinet. The group played Brubeck originals and standards by other composers. Their ground-breaking album "Dave Brubeck Octet" was recorded in 1946.

In 1949, Brubeck with Tjader and bassist Ron Crotty, both fellow octet members, formed a more commercially viable trio and cut their first records, which gained a national audience. After surviving a near-fatal diving accident in 1951, Brubeck formed a quartet by adding Desmond.

Brubeck continued performing with the latest version of his quartet until just past his 90th birthday, despite needing heart surgery and a pacemaker.

In a 2010 interview, Brubeck, who converted to Catholicism in 1980, envisioned an afterlife where he'd again see his family and jazz friends, including Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Count Basie.

Amen to that, brother.

"If there's a heaven," Brubeck said, "let it be a good place for all of us to jam together and have a wonderful, wonderful musical experience."

Brubeck is survived by his wife of 70 years, a daughter and four musician sons. Another son died in 2009.

Check out this reggae cover of "Take Five" by Ossie Scott and other cool covers of one of the greatest tunes ever from Youtube...




... How about this one, with lyrics by the incredible Al Jarreau...



...or Mr George Benson on guitar...

 

...The Bolyki Brothers...



...from Brittni Paiva on electric ukulele...



...and Benjamin Creighton Griffiths on the harp...



Heck, kiddies, I could do this all day.Why don't we all take five from the oppressive fascism of Obamastan and let some joy in?

World War II continues apace...


From ABC via Yahoo News:

That's no ordinary gun, ma'am

 (Image credit: NECN)

 

Just like a scene out of "Antiques Roadshow," a woman in Hartford, Conn., turned in an old rifle to her local police station's gun buy-back, only to discover the gun was worth anywhere from $20,000 to $25,000. The woman, who wishes to remain anonymous, inherited the gun from her father who had brought it home with him from Europe as a memento from World War II.

The two officers conducting the gun buy-back, who are resident gun experts for the Hartford Police Department, informed the owner she was in possession of a Nazi Assault Rifle, the first of its kind, that dates back to 1944.

The gun is called a Sturmgewehr 44, literally meaning "storm rifle," and is the first "modern assault rifle ever made, eventually replaced by the AK 47 in 1947 by Russia, who copied the German design of the Sturmgewehr 44," Officer Lewis Crabtree, one of the two officers who discovered the gun, told ABC News.

"It's like finding the Babe Ruth of baseball cards," said Officer John Cavanna. "The rarity, it was made for such a very short period."

Most people, however, who aren't avid gun fans would have no idea what role this gun played in history.

"If you were to look at the gun and didn't know anything about guns, you would think it was garbage," Crabtree said.

That is essentially what the owner thought the gun was, bringing it to the station knowing full well it would be put into a smelter, melting the gun down into an iron brick.

"People turn in guns for a variety of reasons," Cavanna told ABC. "They don't have a good way to secure it, they have kids around their home, or they don't know how to use it. This is an anonymous way for someone to take an unwanted firearm and get it off the streets. We then give them a $50 or $100 gift card to Wal-Mart."

Crabtree attributes gun accidents to ignorance and carelessness. The anonymous gun buy-back program is aimed at preventing people from running into potentially dangerous situations with a gun they don't know how to use or work.

This seems to be the reason the woman who dropped off the historic rifle.

"Her father passed away. The gun was in her closet," Cavanna said. "She did not know it was a machine gun.

"If the gun had been in the closet loaded, any second you could hit the wrong level and discharge a fatal round," he said of the Sturmgewehr 44.

This German-made machine gun can fire 500 rounds in minutes, according to Cavanna, who is also a gun range master.

At the time the officers received the gun, it was in such disrepair that it was inoperable, unable to shoot a bullet even if the gun had been loaded. Cavanna said ammunition would have to be especially made for this gun.

The unnamed owner of the gun has left the valuable artifact at the police station for safe keeping.

"We did not take the gun in for the gun buy-back program," Crabtree said. "If we took it as part of the buy-back, we would have no choice but to destroy the gun. We don't want to destroy that gun."

The owner intends to sell the Sturmgewehr 44.

"It sounds like her family could use the money," Cavanna said.

Monday, December 10, 2012

The Black Widow inches closer to flight...


From the THE MID-ATLANTIC AIR MUSEUM in Reading, PA:






SEPTEMBER 20, 2012
Pappy Strine, shown here bucking rivets on the P-61 elevator. Luke Jones and Pappy Strine install rivets on the elevator leading edge.

 When the elevator is finally finished the fixture will be modified and reused for rebuilding the wings. One of the drop tanks.

Another one of the drop tanks awaits restoration. Wiring and hydraulics in the right rear of the turret compartment. The fuselage carry thru spars can be seen at right.

The gun compartment showing the two lower 20mm cannons and LH upper gun A view of the cannons.

View of the area behind the instrument panel with the armor plate removed Nose gear wiring to control switches and taxi lights

Gunner's turret control box is mounted on the RH gunners cockpit wall. The landing gear selector handle is mounted left of center on the pilot's sub panel

The flap control handle on the left cockpit wall Bail out bell on LH side between pilot and gunner

Ammeter s and circuit breaker box on RH pilots wall. RH gunners folding armor plate. Cockpit heater is installed in the right rear corner.

Gunners LH folding armor plate. Propeller switch box ready for installation on the left cockpit wall.

he throttle quadrant awaits being strung once the wiring is in place. Mounts for elevator, rudder, and aileron trim wheels. More wiring at the instrument panel. Completed harnesses have cannon plugs installed which are wrapped in plastic.

ilot's instrument panel. The bok to the left contains the main switch panel. Directly in the center is the autopilot rack. The voltage regulator box installed on the bulkhead at the aft end of the gunner's compartment.

RH turret compartment wiring. Once each bundle is complete it will be combed out and laced in place Wiring on the LH turret compartment buss is in process.

Wiring harness inside the lower right fuselage. This is mostly radar wiring. Right hand nose gear door being fitted

Fitting the new leading edge skin to the elevator

Tuesday, December 04, 2012

Jovan Belcher: None dare call it disordered sexual desire...


...or, Sex not properly understood is certainly death, kiddies.

I came to Carthage, where I found myself in the midst of a hissing cauldron of lusts. I had not yet fallen in love, but I was in love with the idea of it, and this feeling that something was missing made me despise myself for not being more anxious to satisfy the need. I began to look around for some object for my love, since I badly wanted to love something.

 — St. Augustine, Confessions



The gun didn't do it.

Steroids didn't do it.

Concussions didn't do it.

The color of Mr. Belcher's skin didn't do it.

Ineffective counseling by the Chiefs didn't do it.

Mr. Belcher's refusal to treat sex properly did do it.

And since he's not the only one, this kind of horror show will continue to plague us all.

From the Kansas City Star:
 by Christine Vendel

Seconds after fatally shooting his longtime girlfriend, Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher leaned over her in their master bathroom, said he was sorry and kissed her on the forehead.

Too little, too late.

His mother, who heard gunfire as she stood in the kitchen, rushed to her son’s bedroom and watched his remorseful goodbye.

Belcher apologized to his mother, kissed his 3-month-old daughter and fled his rented home in the 5400 block of Crysler Avenue in his Bentley.

He couldn't have had a classier hearse.

The Star learned those details and others from multiple police sources Monday as officers continued their investigation into why Belcher, 25, killed his live-in girlfriend, Kasandra Perkins, 22, on Saturday morning. Arguments over relationship and financial issues had simmered for months between them, according to the sources.

Belcher’s mother, who came from New York to live with her son so the couple could work through their issues, didn’t hear much of the argument. But just before 8 a.m., she heard her son say something to the effect of: “You can’t talk to me like that!”

Hmmm...

Does that sound like love to you? Or even "caring"?

Then she heard gunfire.

Afterward, Belcher drove to the only place he felt safe — to his other family at Arrowhead Stadium, police said.

Suicidal folks aren't looking for safety. My guess is he wanted to inflict as much pain as possible on the people he left behind.

As he covered the five miles from his home to the stadium, his violent act weighed on him, police believe.

“He probably realized he had done something and he couldn’t go back,” said Police Sgt. Richard Sharp.

 Contrition, Confession, and Penance, anyone?

In the parking lot of the practice facility at 1 Arrowhead Drive, Belcher encountered Chiefs General Manager Scott Pioli. Belcher stepped out of his Bentley with a gun pointed at his own head, police said.

“I did it,” he said, according to police. “I killed her.”

Club officials knew about the couple’s problems. The Chiefs had provided counseling and “were bending over backward” to help, Sharp said.

But Belcher told Pioli that the assistance wasn’t enough to fix their problems and now, “It was too late.”

Instant Translation: "You didn't do enough to help us. Her blood and mine are on your hands."

When another Chiefs employee arrived, Pioli told him to stay back. Meanwhile Pioli tried to persuade Belcher to lay down the weapon, Sharp said.

Belcher thanked Pioli for everything he had done for him. He asked if he and Clark Hunt would take care of his daughter.

At least he didn't kill the baby. Retroactive abortion is often a feature of these things.

Chiefs Head Coach Romeo Crennel and linebackers coach Gary Gibbs arrived in the parking lot and Belcher reportedly announced, “Guys, I have to do this.”

Crennel tried to dissuade him.

“I was trying to get him to understand that life is not over,” Crennel told The Star. “He still has a chance and let’s get this worked out.’’

A noble effort, coach, but most people think those are just words. They are inclined to dismiss them because they do not believe in the redemption offered to all by Christ.

As Pioli and Crennel tried to reason with Belcher, the men heard police sirens closing in. Belcher then walked a few steps away with the gun still pointed at his head.

“I got to go,” Belcher reportedly said. “I can’t be here.”

Belcher knelt behind a vehicle and made the sign of the cross across his chest before firing a single bullet into his head.

Now that is something unexpected. If Mr. Belcher was a Catholic, he obviously didn't believe strongly enough. If he wasn't a Catholic, perhaps he had known someone who was and thought it might help.

Kansas City police believe Belcher killed himself because he was distraught over what he had done to Perkins.

“He cared about her,” Sharp said. “I don’t think he could live with himself.”

The night before the killings, Perkins had attended a concert downtown with friends, and Belcher had “partied” at the Power and Light District, police said. It was unclear when they arrived home, where Belcher’s mother was watching their baby. A woman who answered Belcher’s mother’s cell phone Monday declined to comment.

This is not love, kiddies. It may be what passes for love in these benighted times, but it is merely two people who got tired of fornicating with each other. And you know what the world tells such people: "Run away! Go find someone else to fuck! That will make everything better!"

Detectives don’t know what specifically sparked the argument between the couple at home, but a friend of Perkins told The Star that the couple argued around 1 a.m. Saturday when Perkins returned home from the Trey Songz concert and drinks with friends afterward. Belcher was mad she had stayed out so late, the friend said.

Sometime later, Kansas City police talked with Belcher after finding him asleep in his Bentley on Armour Boulevard. Officers determined he was able to drive himself home. Police believe he arrived home about 7 a.m., well before a 9:30 team meeting. That’s when the yelling began.

Police said youth, immaturity and financial pressures served as a backdrop. During his college years, Belcher allegedly punched a dormitory window because he was upset over a woman.

More "love".

Autopsies with toxicology tests were performed on both bodies, but results will take weeks, police said. Investigators believe alcohol may have played a role in the argument’s escalation.

Police recovered several legally owned guns from Belcher’s home. Investigators were testing each one, and the gun found with Belcher’s body, against shell casings and bullets they recovered.

Police spokesman Darin Snapp said Monday that Belcher’s mother, who had been staying with the couple, was given temporary custody of the couple’s daughter. But he said it was unclear if the grandmother and baby were still in the Kansas City area.

Perkins, who grew up in Texas, met Belcher, who grew up in New York, through a cousin, Whitney Golden Charles, the wife of Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles. Perkins moved to Kansas City in 2010 to be with Belcher. Her relatives learned of her death from the news, police said. A woman who answered the phone at a relative’s home Monday declined to comment.

Monday afternoon, the family issued a statement that spelled Perkins’ first name with a double s, though she spelled it with one on her Facebook page:

“On behalf of the Perkins Family, we appreciate the outpouring of love and concern for our Kassandra ‘Kasi’ Perkins. Our hearts are truly broken for Kasi was a beloved daughter, granddaughter, sister, mother, cousin and friend.…

“Please keep us in your hearts and prayers as well as the Belcher family for two lives were loss. Again we thank you for your support, our wish is for Kasi to be remembered for the love she shared with us all. Kasi will be truly missed!”
  
"Love" yet again. You'd think all this love would preclude arguments and infidelity, not to mention homicidal and suicidal violence, wouldn't you?

Jamaal Charles also released a statement: “Our family has suffered a personal tragic loss.… As this is a very tough time for our family, I ask that we are respected as we grieve. Kassandra was not only family, but a friend and a loving mother. As my actual family and my Kansas City Chiefs family have been altered forever, we ask that you keep us and most importantly their child in prayer. Thank you all for your continued support.”

Later Monday, Belcher’s somber relatives provided statements outside of Belcher’s boyhood home in New York. Yamiesse Lawrence, a cousin of Belcher’s, said the weekend’s events were an “inconceivable tragedy.”

All too conceivable, obviously.

“As a family, no words can express the sorrow we feel over the loss of Jovan and Kasandra,” Lawrence read aloud.

We instinctively know that love is the most important thing there is. We can't help but take it most seriously. Our so-called culture teaches us that orgasm is love. 

When your orgasm partner [white, black, hetero, homo, whatever] no longer wants to play with you, is it really that surprising if you "snap"?

Monday, December 03, 2012

Ack! Kaepernick sucks now! Quick, Coach Genius, put in the other guy!

Rams edge 49ers 16-13 in overtime

- AP via Yahoo News

DAY 2294: PLUTO HELD HOSTAGE

Photobucket

In a few short months, Dr. Russell Dohner will be labeled an enemy of the people and shipped off to the GULAG.

Actually practicing medicine will soon be a crime, thanks to the jug-eared commie criminal and the traitor John Roberts. 

Next up: Catholicism.

From AP via Yahoo News:

The '$5 doctor' practices medicine from bygone era

 

RUSHVILLE, Ill. (AP) — Patients line up early outside his office just off the town square, waiting quietly for the doctor to arrive, as he has done for nearly 60 years.

Dr. Russell Dohner is, after all, a man of routine, a steady force to be counted on in uncertain times.

Wearing the fedora that has become his trademark, he walks in just before 10 a.m., after rising early to make rounds at the local hospital. There are no appointments. He takes his patients in the order they sign in — first come, first-served. His office has no fax machines or computers. Medical records are kept on hand-written index cards, stuffed into row upon row of filing cabinets.

The only thing that has changed, really — other than the quickness of the doctor's step or the color of his thinning hair — is his fee. When Dohner started practicing medicine in Rushville in 1955, he charged the going rate around town for an office visit: $2.

Now it is $5.

This in an era when the cost of healthcare has steadily risen, when those who don't have medical insurance often forgo seeing a doctor. But not Dohner's patients. He doesn't even accept medical insurance — says it's not worth the bother.

"I always just wanted to be a doctor to help people with their medical problems and that's all it's for .," the 87-year-old family physician says. "It was never intended to make a lot of money."

Being a doctor, helping and providing a service — that has been his goal since he was a boy.

One of seven children, Dohner grew up on a farm just north of Rushville, outside the little town of Vermont, Ill. His father had hoped he'd take up farming, too. But young Dohner had other ideas, inspired by the town doctor who'd treated him when he had seizures as a child.

"I remember waking up and seeing the doctor there and thinking, 'THAT is what I want to do,'" he says.

After serving in the Army in World War II, Dohner went to Western Illinois University, paying for his education with funds provided by the G.I. bill. In the early 1950s, he attended Northwestern University's medical school. He had his sights set on becoming a cardiologist and thought about staying in the big city. But when a doctor in Rushville asked him to put off his heart specialist studies to practice medicine back at home, he agreed to do so, at least for a little while.
Then that doctor left town.

"So I couldn't very well leave," Dohner says. "That's just the way it worked out."
It was a sacrifice, yes. His young wife didn't want to stay in such a small town, he says, and so their marriage ended. He never remarried and instead dedicated his life to his work, only leaving this small central Illinois town for medical conferences over the years, never taking a true vacation.

Even when the medical profession changed around him, he was always on call, ready to drop everything for a patient.

Carolyn Ambrosius, now 69, recalls how her mother went to an obstetrician in Springfield when she was pregnant at age 41, a rarity back then. The doctor there told her that either she'd survive or the baby would, but not both of them — a prognosis her mother refused to accept.

So she went back to Rushville.

"God's going to take care of us — and Dr. Dohner," Ambrosius remembers her mother saying.

And the doctor did, coming to their home each day to check on her during the pregnancy, and often staying to eat meals with the family after he'd completed his exams.

"I'm not sure if he remembers," Ambrosius now says. (By now, the story is vaguely familiar to Dohner. He's delivered a lot of babies in Rushville — "nearly the whole town," by some estimates.)

But her mother did survive. "And my baby brother is now 52," Ambrosius says, standing outside Dohner's office on a crisp fall day after coming in for a check-up.

Stories like that are common around this town, a quaint place with cobblestone streets around the main square and majestic old mansions, some of which have seen better days. It's the sort of place where patients give their doctor a gift or bring baked goods to say thank you. The walls of Dohner's office hold items such as a homemade clock adorned with shiny beads, embroidery, cards, photos and paintings, including one of the doctor fishing, once a favorite pastime.

These days, though, it takes all his energy just to rise before 7 a.m. to head to the hospital, then to his office and back to the hospital, where the "Doctors' Dictating Lounge," named for his father, is set up with a desk and a cot for the occasional nap.

On Thursdays, Dohner closes his office at noon, but even then, he heads to the local nursing home to visit residents. On Sundays, he sees patients before church and stops by the hospital afterward.

He's there, indeed, like clockwork. But as much as townspeople have grown to count on him, they also worry, as he's become increasingly frail.

"He's going to be dearly missed, not just in town but the three- or four-county area around the town, you know, because people come from all over just to him," says Robert Utter, a 37-year-old emergency medical technician who's been a patient since he was a small boy.

The doctor's staff is aging, too. One of his nurses, Rose Busby, is 86. His secretary, Edith Moore, who grew up living next door to the Dohner farm, is 85.
"You been here before?" Moore asks many patients who step up to the office window to sign in throughout the day.

Though she may not remember everyone, she's not surprised when they answer, "Yes."

"Everybody in the world has been here before," she says, somehow managing to find each patient's index card in the filing cabinets that run down the hallway. "They're full," she says.

Moore is the one who collects the $5 fee when the patients leave — though a few times a day, Dohner tells her "never mind" and tries to quietly let a few go with no charge. Patients sometimes protest.

"Next time, I'll pay $20!" one insists. But it's clear that this patient and others are grateful, and often relieved.

Few doctors today could practice medicine the way Dohner does.

"I don't hardly make enough to pay my nurses," he concedes with a chuckle.

Most of his income comes from the farm that his family still owns and that is now run by a nephew. So, although he never became a farmer, the farming life made it possible for this country doctor to maintain his practice, his way.

And he intends to keep it going as long as he possibly can.

"As long as I can make it up here, I'll help if I can," says Dohner, who has no plan to retire. Medical colleagues keep a watchful, caring eye on him.

He notes that his mother lived into her mid-90s. "I guess I don't know anything else to do," he says.

During a visit to Culbertson Memorial Hospital, he stops to see Virginia Redshaw Wheelhouse, a 97-year-old patient. Her eyes open when she hears his voice. The doctor holds her hand and pats her shoulder.

Afterward, stammering but determined to get the words out, she says, "I pray he lives to be 99," as her daughter-in-law, Cathy Redshaw, nods.

"There's no words to describe what he does for people and the effect he has on people," says Cindy Kunkel, a registered nurse at the hospital, where Dohner spends many evenings on "second rounds," as she calls them.

She recalls working the night shift and seeing him pull into the hospital drive, often with a patient in his car.

"He may have his slippers on, but he would have his hat and his suit on," Kunkel says, smiling. "And he would bring a patient in that needed to be put to bed and taken care of."

Stephanie LeMaster, who grew up in Rushville, remembers interviewing Dohner for a school report when she was in fourth grade. Before then, she'd planned on being a nurse, like her mom and grandmother before her. But that interview changed everything, she says.

Dohner became a role model — and now she is a first-year medical student at Southern Illinois University.

"They tell me I should be the next Dr. Dohner, but I'm not sure I can live up to him," LeMaster says. "He's the only one like him."

 

 

 

So THIS is how the Mayan calendar will end us...

From LiveScience.com via Yahoo News:

Atom Smasher Creates New Kind of Matter

Collisions between particles inside the Large Hadron Collider atom smasher have created what looks like a new form of matter.

The new kind of matter is called color-glass condensate, and is a liquid-like wave of gluons, which are elementary particles related to the strong force that sticks quarks together inside protons and neutrons (hence they are like "glue").

Scientists didn't expect this kind of matter would result from the typeof particle collisions going on at the Large Hadron Collider at the time. However, it may explain some odd behavior seen inside the machine, which is a giant loop where particles race around underneath Switzerland and France.

When scientists sped up protons (one of the building blocks of atoms) and lead ions (lead atoms, which contain 82 protons each, stripped of their electrons), and crashed them into each other, the resulting explosions liquefied those particles and gave rise to new particles in their wake. Most of these new particles, as expected, fly off in all directions at close to the speed of light. [Photos: The World's Largest Atom Smasher (LHC)]

But recently scientists noticed that some pairs of particles were flying off from the collision point in correlated directions.

"Somehow they fly at the same direction even though it's not clear how they can communicate their direction with one another. That has surprised many people, including us," MIT physicist Gunther Roland, whose group led the analysis of the collision data along with Wei Liof Rice University, said in a statement.

A similar flight pattern is seen when two heavy particles, such as lead and lead, crash into each other. In this case, the collisions create what's called quark-gluon plasma — a superhot soup of particles similar tothe state of the universe just after the Big Bang. This soup can sweep particles in the same direction, explaining why their flight directions wouldbe correlated.

But quark-gluon plasma isn't possible with lead-proton collisions, like the ones in the new study. Now researchers think a different state of matter, the color-glass condensate, may act in a similar way. The color-glass condensate's dense swarm of gluons may also sweep particles off in the same direction, suggested Brookhaven National Laboratory physicistRajuVenugopalan, who first predicted the substance, which may also be seen after proton-proton collisions.

The mechanism may depend on a weird quirk of particles called quantum entanglement. Two particles can be entangled so that they retain a connection even after they are separated, and an action on one reverberates on the other.

Entangled gluons in the color-glass condensate could explain how particles flying away from the collision point might share information about their flight direction with each other, Venugopalan said.

The intriguing phenomenon was not expected to result from the LHC's run of proton-lead collisions, which was meant to serve as a reference point for comparison to other types of collisions.

"You don't expect quark-gluon plasma effects" with lead-proton collisions, Rolandsaid. "It was supposed to be sort of a reference run — a run in which you can study background effects and then subtract them from the effects that you see in lead-lead collisions."

The findings will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review B.

 

GUN GUNS DOWN YOUNG MOTHER AND FOOTBALL PLAYER; REFUSES TO RAT ITSELF OUT TO COPS!

     "An evil handgun, tentatively identified as an Italian anarchist named Beretta by police sources, Saturday murdered a young woman in front of her three month old daughter, her baby's daddy, Kansas City Chiefs' linebacker Javon Belcher, and Belcher's mother.
     The vile firearm then proceeded to force innocent bystander Belcher to drive to the team's practice facility, thank his coach and GM for all they had dome for him, and then blew poor Mr. Belcher's head clean off. Police, who had tracked the ghastly gat from the original crime scene despite Missouri's complete lack of stringent  gun laws, also watched helplessly as Belcher was robbed of his promising and lucrative career.
     Inexplicably, the perfidious piece then ceased its murderous rampage and fell to the ground, as if it were inert, or possibly playing possum. It was then taken into police custody without further incident.
     Sources in the local District Attorney's office, speaking on condition of anonymity, said they will seek the meltdown penalty for the baffling blaster.
     A local progressive clergyman speculated the horrific hand-cannon could have been possessed, perhaps by Satan himself..."

Demented? Heck no! Not if you are arch-racist sports goonalist Raceon Witless, the terminally overrated Bob Costas, or any other left-fascist AmericaLaster who KNOWS that only the government should have guns and they should only be used to force Catholics into sterilizing their women so they will become nulliparous whores just like all good American girls should be.



Photobucket
ABOVE: The late Jovan Belcher with his girlfriend, the late Kasandra M. Perkins, and child. Police say there is no truth to the rumor this photo was taken by the gun before its falling out with the family.

Steroids, football concussions, red meat consumption, and testosterone will also be blamed. And I'm a racist for suggesting the destruction of the black family by the plantation owners in the Party of Blasphemy, Buggery, and 'Bortion is to blame.

Monday, November 26, 2012

Putting the "pansy" in Repansycan.


Obama may get chance to end Benghazi PR disaster.


You can tell the left-fascists are in power when AP describes the murder of an ambassador and three other Americans as a "PR disaster".

The White House could finally have its chance to close the books on its Benghazi public relations disaster, as key Republicans signal they might not stand in the way of U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice to become the next secretary of state.

"I think she deserves the ability and the opportunity to explain herself and her position," Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., told "Fox News Sunday." ''But she's not the problem. The problem is the president of the United States," who, McCain said, misled the public on terrorist involvement.
 
Rice is widely seen as President Barack Obama's top pick to replace Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as the nation's top diplomat. But Rice's reputation took a serious hit this fall when she relied on unclassified talking points provided by the intelligence community that portrayed the attack in Benghazi, Libya, as a spontaneous assault by a mob angered by an anti-Muslim video posted on YouTube.

Intelligence officials quickly amended their assessment to conclude the attack hadn't been related to other film protests across the Middle East. But that revised narrative was slow to reach the public, prompting Republicans to allege a White House cover-up ahead of the Nov. 6 election.

The attack killed Ambassador Chris Stevens, a State Department computer specialist and two former Navy SEALs who were working as contract security guards. McCain's remarks were in contrast to his previous stance that Rice wasn't qualified to replace Clinton, who is expected to step down soon, and that he would do "whatever is necessary" to block Rice's possible nomination.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, McCain's close friend and colleague on the Senate Armed Services Committee, told ABC's "This Week" he still suspects the White House intentionally glossed over obvious terrorist links in the attack to keep voters from questioning Obama's handling of national security.

But instead of repeating his prior assertion that he was "dead set" against a Rice promotion, Graham suggested he looked forward to hearing her out. If Rice were nominated, "there will be a lot of questions asked of her about this event and others," said Graham, R-S.C.

The subtle shift in GOP tenor on Rice could be the result of internal grumblings on how far to take party opposition. Democrats picked up extra Senate seats in the election to maintain their narrow majority, making it that much harder for the remaining 45 Republicans to block the president's nominees.

One senior GOP Senate aide said Sunday that Republicans hadn't united against Rice and were not convinced she was worth going after. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the aide was not authorized to speak publicly on internal GOP deliberations.

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Doy. Double doy, even.

From the Toronto Star:

Are humans getting dumber?

Forget moon landings and Monet, the invention of the Internet and the discovery of insulin. One Stanford University biologist thinks we’ve actually become less intelligent since the days our cave-dwelling ancestors roamed the Earth.

In a study recently published in the journal Trends in Genetics, Dr. Gerald Crabtree argues that human intelligence peaked at the time of hunter-gatherers and has since declined as a result of “genetic mutations” that have slowly eroded the human brain’s intellectual and emotional abilities.

The argument, which lends weight to the controversial hypothesis that human intelligence is determined by genetics as opposed to the environment, is based on the notion that a large pool of genes must be functioning at full capacity to optimize intellectual and emotional behaviour. 

According to Crabtree, “intelligence” genes were fully functioning in the days of hunter-gatherers, as humans were forced to think critically and creatively to survive. But the shift to agriculture and urbanization, he said, weakened natural selection and opened the door to genetic mutation. 

“I would wager that if an average citizen from Athens of 1000 BC were to appear suddenly among us, he or she would be among the brightest and most intellectually alive of our colleagues and companions,” he said. 

But fear not, said Crabtree, as the dumbing-down of humanity is a slow process, with only about “two or more” harmful mutations sustained in the past 3,000 years. He predicted a technological solution will be found to halt the mutations and “thus, the brutish process of natural selection will be unnecessary.”

It’s a polarizing stance in a field of research long divided by the “nature versus nurture” debate. While neither is scientifically proven, the idea that intelligence is rooted in genetic has had broad social and political implications, including the controversial eugenics movement. 

University of Toronto psychology professor Eyal Reingold, whose research leans toward the ‘nurture’ argument, described Crabtree’s research as “quite misleading” and said there are more serious threats to intellectual and emotional competency in the 21st century that are environment-based. 

Government schools sure ain't helpin'.

“When you see events such as children bringing guns to schools and bullying, they are all indications of failure of social competencies and decline in that domain,” he said.

About Me

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First of all, the word is SEX, not GENDER. If you are ever tempted to use the word GENDER, don't. The word is SEX! SEX! SEX! SEX! For example: "My sex is male." is correct. "My gender is male." means nothing. Look it up. What kind of sick neo-Puritan nonsense is this? Idiot left-fascists, get your blood-soaked paws off the English language. Hence I am choosing "male" under protest.

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