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"Let no freedom be allowed to novelty, because it is not fitting that any addition should be made to antiquity. Let not the clear faith and belief of our forefathers be fouled by any muddy admixture." -- Pope Sixtus III

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Not all polls are created equal.

 Scott Rasmussen is as close to impartial as pollsters get, kiddies.

From Rasmussen Reports:

 Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

 Tuesday, October 23, 2012

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Tuesday shows Mitt Romney attracting support from 50% of voters nationwide, while President Obama earns the vote from 46%. One percent (1%) prefers some other candidate, and two percent (2%) are undecided. 

Other than brief convention bounces, this is the first time either candidate has led by more than three points in months. See daily tracking history

Romney attracts support from 89% of Republican voters. The president earns the vote from 82% of Democrats. Among those not affiliated with either major party, the GOP challenger leads by nine. 

These updates are based upon nightly telephone interviews and reported on a three-day rolling average basis. As a result, virtually all of the interviews for today’s update were completed before the end of last night’s final presidential debate. It will take a few days to see if the debate had a significant impact on the race. 

Matchup results are updated daily at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update). 

 
Ohio President
 
Thursday, October 18, 2012

The second presidential debate doesn’t appear to have made a difference in Rasmussen Reports’ first post-debate look at the race in Ohio. It’s still a toss-up.
The latest telephone survey of Likely Ohio Voters, taken last night, shows President Obama with 49% support to Mitt Romney’s 48%.  One percent (1%) prefers another candidate, and two percent (2%) are still undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 


The survey of 750 Likely Voters in Ohio was conducted on October 17, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is  onducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology
  

Virginia President

 Friday, October 19, 2012


Mitt Romney has now hit the 50% mark in Virginia. 

The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Likely Virginia Voters, taken two nights after the second presidential debate, shows Romney with 50% support to President Obama’s 47%. Two percent (2%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)  
 
Virginia, considered a critical state to both candidates’ political fortunes, remains a Toss-Up in the Rasmussen Reports Electoral College Projections

A week ago, Romney led 49% to 47% in Virginia. Prior to this survey, the candidates have been within two points or less of each other in every survey here since April. 

Ninety-four percent (94%) of likely voters in the Old Dominion say they are certain to vote in this election. Among these voters, Romney leads 52% to 47%.
Among the 88% of voters in the state who say they’ve already decided whom they will vote for, it’s Romney 51%, Obama 49%. 

Romney has small leads among both male and female voters in the state. Voters not affiliated with either of the major political parties prefer the Republican challenger by a modest 49% to 45% margin. 


 Florida President 

 Thursday, October 18, 2012

Mitt Romney has taken his biggest lead of the year in Florida and now outpaces President Obama by five points in the key swing state following Tuesday night's debate. 

The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey of Likely Florida Voters finds Romney with 51% support to Obama’s 46%. One percent (1%) prefers some other candidate, and two percent (2%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)  

Florida now moves from a Toss-Up to Leans Romney in the Rasmussen Reports Electoral College Projections

Last week, Romney held a slightly narrower 51% to 47% lead. Prior to that time, the candidates have been within two points of each other in Florida in every survey since April. 

Ninety-five percent (95%) of likely voters in the Sunshine State say they are certain to vote in this year’s election. Among these voters, it’s Romney 51%, Obama 47%. 

Florida allows early voting, and among voters who have already voted, Romney's ahead 51% to 45%.  

Among those who have yet to vote, 88% say they have already made up their minds which candidate they will vote for. Romney leads 54% to 45% among these voters.  

Still, a plurality (49%) of all voters in the state expect Obama to win the election, while 38% think Romney will come out on top. But that's a narrower gap than is found nationally


 Daily Swing State Tracking Poll

 Tuesday, October 23, 2012

The full Swing State tracking update offers Rasmussen Reader subscribers a combined view of the results from 11 key states won by President Obama in 2008 and thought to be competitive in 2012. The states collectively hold 146 Electoral College votes and include Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin. If you do not already have a Rasmussen Reader account, subscribe now

Platinum Members have access to detailed demographic information

In the 11 swing states, Mitt Romney earns 50% of the vote to Obama’s 45%. Two percent (2%) like another candidate in the race, and four percent (4%) are undecided. 

This is now the third time Romney has hit the 50% mark in the combined swing states in the past four days and is the biggest lead either candidate has held in nearly three weeks. This survey is conducted on a rolling seven-day basis, and as a result, virtually all of the interviews for today’s update were completed before the end of last night’s presidential debate. Romney has now held a modest lead for 12 of the last 15 days; Obama was ahead twice, and the candidates ran even once.   

In 2008, Obama won these states by a combined margin of 53% to 46%, virtually identical to his national margin. 

Romney now leads by 16 points among male voters in the swing states and trails by three points among female voters. 

Nationally, Romney has now also hit the 50% level of support in the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll




Release Date
Obama
Romney
NET                   
October 23, 2012
45
50
Romney +5
October 22, 2012
46
49
Romney +3
October 21, 2012
46
50
Romney +4
October 20, 2012
46
50
Romney +4
October 19, 2012
47
49
Romney +2
October 18, 2012
48
49
Romney +1
October 17, 2012
50
47
Obama +3
October 16, 2012
49
47
Obama +2
October 15, 2012
48
48
Even
October 14, 2012
47
49
Romney +2
October 13, 2012
48
49
Romney +1
October 12, 2012
48
49
Romney +1
October 11, 2012
48
49
Romney +1
October 10, 2012
47
49
Romney +2
October 9, 2012
47
49
Romney +2
October 8, 2012
49
47
Obama +2
October 7, 2012
49
47
Obama +2
October 6, 2012
49
46
Obama +3
October 5, 2012
50
45
Obama +5
October 4, 2012
51
45
Obama +6
October 3, 2012
50
45
Obama +5
October 2, 2012
50
45
Obama +5
October 1, 2012
51
45
Obama +6
September 30, 2012
48
44
Obama +4
September 29, 2012
47
45
Obama +2
September 28, 2012
46
46
Even
September 27, 2012
46
46
Even
September 26, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 25, 2012
47
44
Obama +3
September 24, 2012
46
44
Obama +2
September 23, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 22, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 21, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 20, 2012
47
46
Obama +1
September 19, 2012
46
47
Romney +1
September 18, 2012
46
47
Romney +1
September 17, 2012
45
47
Romney +2
September 16, 2012
45
47
Romney +2
September 15, 2012
46
46
Even
September 14, 2012
46
46
Even
September 13, 2012
47
45
Obama +2
September 12, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 11, 2012
47
45
Obama +2
September 10, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 9, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
September 8, 2012
45
46
Romney +1
September 7, 2012
45
46
Romney +1
September 6, 2012
43
47
Romney +4
September 5, 2012
44
47
Romney +3
September 4, 2012
44
46
Romney +2
September 3, 2012
44
46
Romney +2
September 2, 2012
44
46
Romney +2
September 1, 2012
45
45
Even
August 31, 2012
45
45
Even
August 30, 2012
46
43
Obama +3
August 29, 2012
47
44
Obama +3
August 28, 2012
47
44
Obama +3
August 27, 2012
48
44
Obama +4
August 26, 2012
46
45
Obama +1
(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

 

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information. 

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter, the Rasmussen Report on radio and other media outlets.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentaries are available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $3.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on Election 2012, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

Scott Rasmussen, president of Rasmussen Reports, has been an independent pollster for more than a decade. To learn more about our methodology, click here.

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About Me

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First of all, the word is SEX, not GENDER. If you are ever tempted to use the word GENDER, don't. The word is SEX! SEX! SEX! SEX! For example: "My sex is male." is correct. "My gender is male." means nothing. Look it up. What kind of sick neo-Puritan nonsense is this? Idiot left-fascists, get your blood-soaked paws off the English language. Hence I am choosing "male" under protest.

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